The good old British class system ...

Posted: Friday 29th May 2020

Remember that classic sketch parodying the British class system with Ronnie Corbett as the working class man, Ronnie Barker as the middle class fellow and John Cleese as the upper class chap? It goes something like; ‘I look up to him because he is upper class, but I look down on him because he is lower class.’ and all the other permutations… (If you’re not old enough to have heard of it google ‘the class sketch 1966’.) It’s just brilliant.

And it got us thinking: What might the caricatures be amongst our professional tribes in the public sector? Please grant us some poetic license in our exaggerations…

The psychotherapist looks down on him because he merely intellectualises with rational thought, and on her because she runs around sorting out problems.

The doctor looks down on her for her hysterical fixation on emotion and on her for her menial tasks.

The social worker looks down on him and her because they’re both out of touch, and not doing any real work.  

In truth, it seems to us that doing, feeling and thinking are all important and none is superior nor inferior to the others. It is wonderful that we have a variety of professions in the public sector which all accentuate the doing, feeling and thinking differently. At MyST, our multiagency partnership approach affirms to us continually that it is in the blending together of different professionals and organisations that something greater than the sum of its parts is generated. When we put this elixir to work for children and families then great things can happen.

That said, let us also risk contradicting ourselves… We think perhaps the Ronnie Corbett of the three is ‘doing’, and with this prejudice in mind, big up to all of the do-ers! Doing is a specialism all of its own.

Jen and Jael

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  • Charlotte Drury
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    1. At 6:55PM on 29 May 2020, Charlotte Drury wrote

    I agree, doing is crucial, but without the thinking and feeling it risks becoming perfunctory and disconnected, our children need to be cared about (which is where the thinking and feeling comes in) and not just cared for:)

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